• Photo by Rantje Allen

  • Photo by William Tan

  • Photo by Rantje Allen

  • Photo by William Tan

  • Photo by Rantje Allen

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Monthly Archives: October 2016

Karawo Fashion Show 2016

Karawo Fashion Show 2016 delighted an international audience recently in Gorontalo.

Traditional Meets International

Karawo Fashion Show 2016
Ladies evening wear

Karawo is the name for Gorontalo’s traditional embroidery. Local demand for this cloth is very high. Orders mostly come for women’s matching suit and skirt outfits, for men’s shirts, and for tablecloths and napkins. Women’s fabrics detail vibrant floral patterns and colors. For men, geometric shield designs and pastels traditionally dominate for men.

That was until recently. Gorontalo’s provincial government seeks to develop local designers for the international market. Hence, that is the driving force behind Karawo Fashion Show 2016.

Karawo Fashion Show 2016 Design Competition

As part of the annual festival, Karawo Fashion Show 2016 included a design competition. Categories included casual wear, office wear, and evening wear. Also, women’s Muslim wear was another category.  This is in keeping with the culture of the area. Most designs were for women. A few were for men.

The Karawo Fashion Show 2016 featured models parading on the catwalk. Audience members came from all over the world. This included observers from Egypt to Norway.

Drawn Threadwork

Karawo Fashion Show 2016
Traditional meets modern in menswear

In other areas of the world, the seamstress embroiders directly on a piece of cloth. However, karawo involves removing, tying off, and replacing certain threads to create traditional designs. The embroidery is actually inside the cloth. Designs for Karawo Fashion Show 2016 were spectacular.

The seamstress receives the design on paper with grid lines. It must show the position of each thread in the piece of cloth. The paper design shows which threads must be replaced. It also indicates what color the replacement threads will be. Based on the design, she will first begin by drawing out or removing the parts of the threads. This process is called drawn thread work.

In doing this, she creates a grid work. Any thread that is partially removed must be tied off at each end. Otherwise, the cloth will unravel. A pattern measuring two centimeters will typically require the removing of ten threads in each direction. Of course, that will depend on the thread count of the cloth.

Now Sew Colored Threads into the Grid to Make a Design

After creating the grid, she will embroider the design into the cloth. Colored threads can be solid or two-tone. Some designs call for metallic thread.

Karawo Fashion Show 2016
Designer with her creations

Not all the drawn thread is replaced by colored thread. Otherwise, the new pattern would simply be a box shape. Some places where the thread has been drawn still have the threads that form the grid for the design left exposed and loose. Each place where a horizontal and vertical thread meet must be tied together. That way the integrity of the fabric remains. This means that each empty box of the grid must by tied off at each of its four corners. How complicated!

After you book your dive trip with us, please remind us to point out karawo clothing worn by locals.

Gorontalo Airport Features New Terminal

Gorontalo airport has a new terminal building. For travelers both local and international, the facility upgrade will provide a pleasant experience.

Djalaluddin Airport’s New Terminal

gorontnalo airport sky bridge
View through blue-tinted glass

Opening in mid-2016, the new terminal at Gorontalo airport sports an attractive design. This design calls to mind the influence of the province’s deep blue oceans. Consequently, its external architecture features waves as well as glass tinted a deep blue.

The new Gorontalo airport terminal has numerous modern features. These include spacious baggage claim areas and corridors. Passengers arriving by large jet can now exit using sky bridges. Additionally, the airport is smoke-free. The new terminal provides a designated smoking area.

Gorontalo Airport in History

The Indonesian military originally developed the airport for its use in the 1950s. In 1974 the military initiated a name change. As a result, the original name of Tolotio Airport became Djalaluddin Airport. Djalaluddin is the name of a Gorontalo colonel pilot. He died in the Dwikora Operation in Malaysia in 1964. He was lost along with his Hercules aircraft. Consequently, the name change marked a decade after this tragedy.

The Gorontalo airport expanded after Gorontalo became its own province in 2000. Then Governor Fadel Muhammad extended the runways to accommodate jets. Additionally, he procured an airport instrument landing system, allowing planes to land at night.

Miguel’s Diving staff remember the quiet days at the airport in the late 1990s. Prospective passengers would drive to the airport. Then everyone would wait for the single flight from Manado. If the plane did not arrive, everyone would return home. They knew that the flight had been canceled because of too few passengers.

gorontalo airport baggage claim
New baggage claim area

Nowadays, major airlines provide daily flights. These airlines include Garuda Indonesia, Lion Air, Batik Air and Sriwijaya. Wings Air now flies at least once a day to Manado.

The IATA code for the Gorontalo airport is GTO.

Infrastructure Development

Gorontalo’s new terminal building represents one of the large projects of Indonesian central government to improve infrastructure in the vast archipelago. Terminal 3 at the main Jakarta airport is another example. That airport is Sukarno-Hatta in Banten. Airports that mark transit points for Gorontalo-bound travelers also have fairly new terminals. Those include Hasanuddin in Makassar, Ngurah Rai in Denpasar Bali and Sam Ratulangi in Manado.

Divers, who arrange diving packages with Miguel’s Diving, enjoy airport transfers. To book your dive trip,please contact with us.

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